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Employers will have to itemise payslips for employees’ wages which vary depending on how much time they have worked under new rules introduced by the Government.

The Employment Rights Act 1996 (Itemised Pay Statement) (Amendment) Order 2018 was laid before Parliament earlier this month.

Under the Order, which is due to come into force on 6 April 2019, employers must also include the number of hours they are paying the employee for.

From next April, employers must either:

  • Show the combined number of hours worked for which payment is being made, or;
  • Itemise the figures for different types of work worked and/or different rates of pay.

This change to legislation is aimed at employees who work varied hours and whose pay changes accordingly. Itemised payslips will increase transparency for both employers and employees alike.

For example, if an employee has a different rate of pay for day and night shift work, the details of their hours on each shift will have to be set out on their payslip.

Before the Order comes into force, employers should ensure payroll processes are adjusted to collect the new information required.

How can our employment law specialists help?

For expert guidance on how the changes will affect your business, contact our solicitors in Ipswich

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Employers can ban workers from wearing Islamic headscarves or any other “political, philosophical or religious sign”, Europe’s top court has ruled.

But to ensure the decision doesn’t constitute discrimination, it must be based on internal company rules requiring all employees to “dress neutrally”, according to the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

The court ruled that limits on visible religious wear were permitted under EU law as long as they apply across the board — meaning any ban would have to include items such as turbans, Jewish kippahs or crucifixes as well as Islamic headscarves.

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Last year the UK Government confirm that it will be adopting the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (Brexit won’t save you!). While complying with the existing data protection regime should give businesses a head start to complying with the GDPR the GDPR introduces new concepts.

It comes into force on 25 May 2018, introduces a risk based approach to compliance and requires various documents to be maintained. GDPR also means that businesses may need to make substantial changes to their existing compliance strategies. Businesses should create awareness among staff of data subjects’ rights and data protection principles and bee able to demonstrate compliance with the GDPR, e.g:

o Audit and document the data held, where it came from and with whom it is shared.

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