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Employers will have to itemise payslips for employees’ wages which vary depending on how much time they have worked under new rules introduced by the Government.

The Employment Rights Act 1996 (Itemised Pay Statement) (Amendment) Order 2018 was laid before Parliament earlier this month.

Under the Order, which is due to come into force on 6 April 2019, employers must also include the number of hours they are paying the employee for.

From next April, employers must either:

  • Show the combined number of hours worked for which payment is being made, or;
  • Itemise the figures for different types of work worked and/or different rates of pay.

This change to legislation is aimed at employees who work varied hours and whose pay changes accordingly. Itemised payslips will increase transparency for both employers and employees alike.

For example, if an employee has a different rate of pay for day and night shift work, the details of their hours on each shift will have to be set out on their payslip.

Before the Order comes into force, employers should ensure payroll processes are adjusted to collect the new information required.

How can our employment law specialists help?

For expert guidance on how the changes will affect your business, contact our solicitors in Ipswich

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If you tuned into the BBC this morning, you’ll have heard or watched as some of the corporation’s best-known presenters talked about their own salaries – and the gaping gender disparity between remuneration for male and female stars.

The furore over who earns what at the BBC follows the publication of pay scales for those who are paid more than £150,000 a year.

While the bumper salaries handed to the likes of Chris Evans (up to £2.5m) and Gary Lineker (at least £1.75m) caused a stir, the real controversy has surrounded the pay gap between men and women.

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In 2015, Nicola Thorp, an administrator temp was sent home from a job. Not because of her ability to perform her tasks but because of her refusal to wear 2 – 4 inch heels. Her response was to campaign for legislation to be tightened in relation to “sexist” dress codes: a campaign which gained considerable public support and a petition with 152,400 signatures.

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Unpopular proposals to hike the fees paid by bereaved families have been put on hold until after the General Election.

The Government had planned to sharply increase probate costs next month to raise around £300 million a year towards running the courts and tribunal service. However, following Prime Minister Theresea May’s decision to call a snap election, the Ministry of Justice has announced there is not enough time to push the reforms through Parliament.

The issue will now be a matter for the next Government. The delay will come as a welcome reprieve to many, with the so-called changes dubbed a ‘stealth death tax’ by critics.

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Gotelee Solicitors are pleased to announce their new Chief Executive, Charles Rowett.

Charles will succeed Alistair Lang who is retiring at Easter after three years with Gotelee. Charles is no stranger to Suffolk having lived in the Woodbridge area for over twenty years and he held various executive roles locally in Gist-brocades UK and Hutchison Ports as well as in financial services and management consulting. Most recently he has been CEO at Yorkshire Cancer Research, the largest independent cancer charity in England. He commented, “I’m delighted to be coming back to Suffolk and to joining Gotelee at such an exciting time. The firm has an outstanding reputation in the region and there are enormous opportunities to build on the excellent work of Alistair and the Partners in a market that is changing rapidly.”

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Employers can ban workers from wearing Islamic headscarves or any other “political, philosophical or religious sign”, Europe’s top court has ruled.

But to ensure the decision doesn’t constitute discrimination, it must be based on internal company rules requiring all employees to “dress neutrally”, according to the European Court of Justice (ECJ).

The court ruled that limits on visible religious wear were permitted under EU law as long as they apply across the board — meaning any ban would have to include items such as turbans, Jewish kippahs or crucifixes as well as Islamic headscarves.

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MAD-HR are running a one day workshop aimed at those people who essentially didn’t move out of the way quickly enough when the MD looked for someone to cover HR or perhaps have assumed responsibility for HR, as they know it’s important, and want peace of mind that they are doing what they are supposed to be doing. It is also spot on for those of you who need to expand your team and don't really know where to start. Whatever your reason for needing HR expertise, this course will deliver the bags of knowledge and easy to follow guidance on the fundamentals of employing people robustly and legally. 

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